Making “Sense” of Modern Worship: Scripture, Spirit, AND Sacrament

A Guest Post by Ryan Flanigan

The following guest post by good friend Ryan Flanigan further explores the theme of friend Glenn Packiam in “What You Probably Don’t Know About Modern Worship.” His insights from his contemporary worship leadership roots and Anglican experience leading at All Saints Dallas are priceless in this conversation. If you connect with the contemporary worship experience, and the liturgical life of worship, you’ll love this addition to the conversation.

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Photo courtesy of www.clairemccormack.com

Making “Sense” of Modern Worship: Scripture, Spirit, and Sacrament
By Ryan Flanigan

Glenn Packiam is one of the most important voices in modern worship. In an attempt to reason with those who continually slam modern worship, Glenn posted this fantastic blog on what critics might not know about modern worship:

http://mysteryoffaithblog.com/2016/01/15/what-you-probably-dont-know-about-modern-worship

As Glenn argues, not all modern churches are alike, so it’s usually unhelpful to make blanket statements about what’s wrong with modern worship or to lump all megachurch worship with modern worship. He also observes that much criticism of modern worship comes from people who want to “kill” it rather than people who want to make it better.

He then speaks to the good in modern worship, such as its Spiritual inspiration, missional impulse, and emotional engagement.

Three Streams

Glenn and I share similar journeys and convictions about worship. We were both born into liturgical traditions, have both spent considerable time in the charismatic world, have both been educated in evangelical theology and have both found our way into the Anglican tradition, where there is freedom for all three of these streams — liturgical, charismatic, and evangelical—to find full expression and form. (Read my story here.)

Lent Reading: Voice From The Darkness [Death]

Worship Readings and Prayers for Contemporary Churches [Cycle of Life]

Many years ago, I set out to write a series of readings that could be used in contemporary churches for worship through the Lent, Easter, and Pentecost season. This one is from Worship Readings And Prayers For Contemporary Churches: The Cycle of Life [Vol. 2 – Liturgies and Readings For Lent, Good Friday, Easter, and Pentecost]. Feel free to use it in your community worship setting.

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While some of the readings in the Voice From The Darkness Series are responsive, this first one is meant to be read by a lone voice, possibly from the back of the room, on Ash Wednesday, any Sunday during Lent, or Good Friday.

What You (Probably) Don’t Know About Modern Worship (Glenn Packiam)

If You're A Worship Leader, Please Read This

Friend Glenn Packiam (www.mysteryoffaithblog.com) recently posted his response to the current tide of voices calling for an end to the “modern worship” enterprise. It’s one of the best recent posts on the topic to date.

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image from Glenn’s original post

I’ve written a few similar posts on this same topic, touching the idea that nuance is vital in conversations like these. Sweeping judgments of entire movements (megachurches, the “industry”, etc.) are unhelpful in moving us all forward.

Glenn, in this post, addresses the vantage point from which these articles are often written, and conveys why certain arguments lack care and – to put it simply – the due diligence of adequate research (primarily phenomenological research).

As a reader of my blog, I commend it to your reading and sharing. These are the kinds of words that must become as viral as any rant about the contemporary worship experience.

“What You (Probably) Don’t Know About Modern Worship” by Glenn Packiam.

My Response To “8 Reasons The Worship Industry Is Killing Worship”

Nuance Matters When Worship Is Concerned

On October 19, 2015, Patheos.com published the post 8 Reasons The Worship Industry Is Killing Worship by Jonathan Aigner. By all accounts the post has gone viral among those who care about the topic of worship. This is both encouraging, and disturbing. First, there is much in the post’s content that is helpful, insightful, and accurate. However, in my humble opinion, the post lacks nuance and generosity in some of the conclusions made. This moves me to strongly disagree with a number of the statements in the article.

Big Tree

My time is limited for writing this response, which will reveal itself in a lack of editing and a few typos. Apologies. I may/will also be accused of leaving out particular ideas intentionally. That is not my intent, but I see the suggestion coming so I mention this at the beginning of my response. Please be gracious with me.

As well, when I sound pointed in my remarks, please read them as if the author and I are having a coffee and the conversation is passionate yet playful.